God Save Monarchy!

'Where men are forbidden to honour a king they honour millionaires, athletes or film stars instead: even famous prostitutes or gangsters. For spiritual nature, like bodily nature, will be served: deny it food and it will gobble poison.'
– CS Lewis

beatonna:

these are not your hands these are King Baby’s hands

beatonna:

these are not your hands these are King Baby’s hands

beatonna:

King Baby did not stutter 

beatonna:

King Baby did not stutter 

Was History’s Richest Person Black?

Mansa Musa was emperor of the West African kingdom of Mali in its golden years between 1312 and 1337 A.D. He became something of an international celebrity in 1324 (the year Marco Polo died) when he made the 3,000 mile, nine-month pilgrimage to Mecca, accompanied by 60,000 porters in a caravan of 80 camels, each carrying 300 pounds of gold. In fact, according to a new inflation-adjusted list compiled by CelebrityNetworth.com, Mansa Musa was worth $400 billion, which, incredibly, places him as the No. 1 richest person in history, ahead of the Rothschild family ($350 billion), John D. Rockefeller ($340 billion) and Henry Ford ($199 billion)…

In his 25-year reign as king of kings in Mali, Musa launched diplomatic relations with Morocco. He underwrote students studying abroad (you might call them Musa Scholars). And last, but not least, as a result of his famous pilgrimage, he spread the legend of Mali through the Islamic world to Europe, where, before long, his image began appearing on cartographers’ maps. One from 1375 shows Musa on his throne admiring a golden nugget in one palm and clutching a golden scepter in the other. By then, he had been dead for 40 years, but his legend as “the Lion of Mali” endured.

'The American Monarchist' by T. John Jamieson (1984)

We are not all Republicans now. The American civil war of 1775-1781 did not abolish human nature, particularly the imaginative faculty of the mass mind which invests a mere human family with the charismatic attraction of a dynasty. Thus, at its worst, the American public exalts a tribe of ambitious bootleggers, the Kennedys, to quasi-royal status. At its best, it finds a genuine royal family, the British, irresistible. First Lady Betty Ford naïvely manifested a typically American attitude when she unintentionally slighted some other nation’s sovereign by referring, before the press, to HM Elizabeth II as ‘the real queen.’ By its Windsorite fervor, of course, America not only reveals its psychological need for a monarchy but also bows to the nation that is the source of its heritage.
Yet, in addition to this phenomenon of unconscious monarchism, there is also a conscious sort. Avowed American monarchists comprise a small élite; they are more or less serious, more or less alienated, sometimes British loyalists by descent or by sentiment, more often champions of all dynasties, though with a legitimist bias—Jacobites, blancs d’Espagne, Carlists. Apparent strangers in their own land, it is a bit difficult for them to find some­thing to do on the Fourth of July, that principal feast of the American civil religion; obligingly, however, many American orchestras, ensconced in their outdoor summer havens, will play ‘Wellington’s Victory’ or the ‘1812 Overture’ on that day, hoping to make sufficient noise to exorcise evil spirits—a more intelligible superstition than the superstition of democracy. Few besides the American monarchist will be conscious of the composers’ intent to celebrate the triumph of monarchy.

The manifestations of America’s founding myth irritate but do not intimidate its indigenous royalists; the inner contradictions of that myth emotionally repatriate them. The con­stitution which virtually froze the eighteenth-century British system in the form of an elective monarchy (which faces a quadrennial crisis of dynastic extinction) reverberates with echoes of its original that belie the republican symbolism of the capital’s neoclassical architecture; as when Richard Nixon excused himself from the charge of obstruction of justice on grounds that ‘the sovereign is above the law.’
Unless he is just an over-sentimental student of history (and there is an urge to follow an antique drum—the Young Pretender’s, for example), the American monarchist is an alienated man. Now there are several kinds of alienation, and when they are all rated against the standard of magnanimity, some are rather grand, some inconsequential, others pathological. The political faiths of modernity comprise no small part of the absurdity of contemporary life as the monarchist perceives it; existential monarchism could indeed be the consequence of Christian existentialism. There is the tsarism of the once-radical Dostoevsky to consider, also the non-resistance doctrine of the Non-Jurors in the face of an anti-Anglican king, and, in the realm of ecclesiastical monarchy, the ultramontane infallibilism of the ultra-royalist Joseph de Maistre, whose Pope had made peace with the regicide republic. The spiritually circumscribed ‘mathematical’ mind of the Enlightenment liberal cannot accept such contradictions. Indeed, the American monarchists who are in the best position to be taken seriously are deeply Christian, and by force of will they have made sense of life as they found it without moving one inch geographically. Homo sum; humani nihil a me alienum puto.
Coat of arms of the Kingdom of Two Sicilies
Reynaldo Alexis Santana, King of the Naso

“An interesting legend concerning the old Hand tavern was told to me by historian Karl Dickinson. In the autumn of 1777, when the American cause as at low ebb, a stranger came galloping into the village of Romney Marsh and stopped at the Hand place. Days passed and he showed no inclination to leave. On one occasion in the public room he said he hoped to see the day when every rebel would hang high, and he invited all to drink to the health of King George. The tavern was a hotbed of Liberty Boys, so he had no takers. In fact, immediately afterward he disappeared. No one today knows what happened to the Loyalist stranger. But years later, when the tavern was remodeled, human bones were found cemented in a basement recess. They were never identified.”

—   William McMahon, South Jersey Towns
Flag of the Jaffna Kingdom (1215-1624)

Interview with Gabula IV, Kyabazinga (King) of Busoga, before his coronation on 13 September, 2014.